Thursday, 29 June 2017

A Level Media Studies - Specification Overview



LINK

Create A CD Cover

  1. Make two CD covers (follow the instructions below). 
  2. Save as a jpeg and email to l.downie@lutterworthcollege.com or n.ford@lutterworthcollege.com
CD Cover Activity
  • Choose two different music artists and make two CD covers. 
  • These can be for existing albums or for ones you have invented yourself. 
  • One must include an image of the artist (see example below for American rapper Kanye West).
  • One must not include an image of the artist (see example above for American punk band Sonic Youth).



PHOTOSHOP FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Where do I find it?

In the start menu, select - all programmes - common programmes - Adobe Production Premium - PhotoShop (64bit)

How do I get started?

In the upper left select - file - new

What page size do I need?

CD covers are SQUARE, alter the height and width to 120mm
Ensure the colour mode is 8bit, the resolution is 300 and the background colour is white.

How do I add an image?

You should have been able to save your image from google. In the upper left select - file - open and locate the image you downloaded. The image will appear in a new tab, DO NOT PANIC, pull the tab down by pressing and holding the left mouse button until it appears in front of your white square tab, next press shift + v to drag and drop the image onto your white square tab

The Image doesn't fill the square!

Press ctrl + t, now press and hold shift, pinch the corner of the image (and only the corner) and stretch it until it fills the space. You can use the move tool (shift v) to align it properly.

How do I add text?

On the left hand side it a T, click on the T and then draw a text box where ever you wish. Type the name of your band and select a font and a size just as you would do on word.

Why doesn't it look quite right?

In really, really basic terms, design is about symmetry. Try and imagine your CD cover is divided equally into thirds, in 2 of these thirds something 'different' should be happening to the remaining third. Try and align yours along these principles.

Year 12 Summer Reading


To ensure you are ready for the start of the A level course in September you need to ensure that you have completed the following (click on text for links):
  • Read this on Common stereotypes
  • Watch The Jungle Book films from 1967 and 2016
  • Read at least one copy of the Daily Mail and The Guardian newspapers
And print out a copy of this:

Monday, 12 June 2017

Lip-synching task

  • Choose any song.
  • Lip synch thirty seconds of the song.
  • Everyone to have a go.
  • Post the results onto your blogs.

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

12Y - Continuity task groups

  1. Abbi, Maya, Helen
  2. Caitlin, Daisy, Hannah, Kitty
  3. Sam, Jay, Fin, Ethan
  4. Jack, Abbie, Phil
  5. Amy, Kate, Charlotte

Monday, 5 June 2017

12V - Continuity task groups


  1. Jasmine, Nieeve, Rosie, Tegan
  2. Steph, Ceri, Amy
  3. Izzy, Frank, George S, Ben
  4. Charlee, Harri, James, George G
  5. George A,Will, Cam, Alfie, Alex

Transition to A2 - Activity 1: The Continuity Exercise

As part of the transition from AS to A2 you must walk into a room and sit down. This activity is the first part of your A2 coursework and must be completed by all students.
Work in a group of no more than 4 students.

Continuity task involving filming and editing a character opening a door, crossing a room and sitting down in a chair opposite another character, with whom she/he then exchanges a couple of lines of dialogue. This task should demonstrate the shots listed below.

All students must produce their own storyboard and edit their own version of the footage. Your film clip must have a minimum of 12 shots. Your film needs to be about one minute in length.

Roles:
  1. Actor 1
  2. Actor 2
  3. Director
  4. Camera operator
Shots:
  1. Close up
  2. Extreme close up
  3. Medium shot
  4. Long shot
  5. Match on action
  6. Shot reverse shot
  7. Two shot

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

12Y & 12Z - work to do


  • Set up a temporary blog using the following: yournamea2media1718.blogpot.co.uk
Continue your research into the following types of video:
  • Performance based videos
  • Narrative based videos
  • Disjunctive (abstract/weird videos)
Look at videos across different genres and from across the history of music video. Think about what you like about each video and make notes on the elements you might utilise in your own work.

Both classes have two lessons on this - the work produced should be considerable. I expect at least 10 videos on each blog with descriptions for your choices.

Friday, 19 May 2017

Andrew Goodwin’s seven features of music video


In His Book Dancing in the Distraction Factory Andrew Goodwin points out characteristics and features that can be found in music videos.

  1. Music videos demonstrate genre characteristics. (e.g. stage performance in metal videos, dance routine for boy/girl band, aspiration in Hip Hop). 
  2. There is a relationship between lyrics and visuals. The lyrics are represented with images. (either illustrative, amplifying, contradicting). 
  3. There is a relationship between music and visuals. The tone and atmosphere of the visual reflects that of the music. (either illustrative, amplifying, contradicting). 
  4. The demands of the record label will include the need for lots of close ups of the artist and the artist may develop motifs which recur across their work (a visual style). 
  5. There is frequently reference to notion of looking (screens within screens, mirrors, stages, etc) and particularly voyeuristic treatment of the female body.
  6. The artist may develop motifs or iconography that recur across their work (a visual style)
  7. There are often intertextual reference (to films, TV programmes, other music videos etc).

Music Video Analysis

Music Video Analysis - Example 3

Music Video Analysis - Example 2

Music Video Analysis - Example 1

The A2 Course Outline


The course is worth 200 marks in total - 100 for the coursework and 100 for the exam.

The coursework brief consists of:
  • A music video
  • A CD digipak
  • A magazine advert to promote the CD/album
You also have to undertake relevant research and planning and answer four evaluation questions.

The exam consists of two parts:
  1. Two  30 minute questions on the work you have completed over the previous two years
  2. One question on postmodern media
Mark allocation

Coursework:
  • 20 marks - Research and planning
  • 40 marks - Music video
  • 10 marks - CD digipak
  • 10 marks - Magazine advert
  • 20 marks - Evaluation

Exam:
  • 25 marks - Question 1a
  • 25 marks - Question 1b
  • 50 marks - Question 2 postmodern media


Thursday, 18 May 2017

Andrew Goodwin's Theory

Andrew Goodwin received his Ph.D. in Cultural Studies from the University of Birmingham, England. He is the author of a well-known book on Music Television and cultural theory (Dancing in the Distraction Factory. Music Television and Popular Culture, University of Minnesota Press) and he has published numerous articles on media and cultural theory. His areas of interest include media aesthetics, critical theory and popular music. Professor Goodwin serves on the Editorial Board of Popular Music & Society, is a Corresponding Editor for Media, Culture & Society and writes for Tricycle, Inquiring Mind, and theworsthorse.net. He is currently writing a book about Led Zeppelin.


Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Revision test

Define the following terms:
  1. Hardware
  2. Content
  3. Pre-production
  4. Production
  5. Post-production
  6. Marketing
  7. Above the line marketing
  8. Below the line marketing
  9. Distribution
  10. Exchange
  11. Synergy
  12. Cross media convergence
  13. Institution
  14. Audience
  15. Consumption
  16. Contemporary
  17. Proliferation

Add the relevant detail for both films

Star Wars; The Force Awakens:
  1. Budget
  2. Box office gross (global)
  3. Director
  4. Production companies
  5. Producers
  6. Distributor
  7. Number of screens
  8. Marketing strategies

Ex Machina:
  1. Budget
  2. Box office gross (global)
  3. Director
  4. Production companies
  5. Producers
  6. Distributor
  7. Number of screens
  8. Marketing strategies


Monday, 15 May 2017

Audience and Institution Questions



January 2010
“Media production is dominated by global institutions, which sell their products and services to national audiences”. To what extent do you agree with this statement?

June 2010
What significance does the continuing development of digital media technology have for media institutions and audiences?

January 2011
Discuss the issues raised by media ownership in the production and exchange of media texts in your chosen media area?

June 2011
“Successful media products depend as much upon marketing and distribution to a specific audience as they do upon good production practices”. To what extent would you agree with this statement, within the media area you have studied?

January 2012
To what extent does digital distribution affect the marketing and consumption of media products in the area of media you have studied?

June 2012
"Cross media convergence and synergy are vital processes in the successful marketing of media products to audiences." To what extent do you agree with this statement in relation to your media area?

January 2013
What impact does media ownership have upon the range of products available to audiences in the media area you have studied?

June 2013
Evaluate the role of digital technologies in the marketing and consumption of products in the media are you have studied.

June 2014
The increase in hardware and content in media industries has been significant in recent years. Discuss the effect this has had on institutions and audiences in the media area you have studied.

June 2015
To what extent does media ownership have an impact on the successful distribution of media products in the media area that you have studied?

Audience and Institutions-The 7 Key Concepts


Section B: Institutions and Audiences

Candidates should be prepared to understand and discuss the processes of production, distribution, marketing and exchange as they relate to contemporary media institutions, as well as the nature of audience consumption and the relationships between audiences and institutions. In addition, candidates should be familiar with:

the issues raised by media ownership in contemporary media practice;
• the importance of cross media convergence and synergy in production, distribution and marketing;
• the technologies that have been introduced in recent years at the levels of production, distribution, marketing and exchange;
• the significance of proliferation in hardware and content for institutions and audiences;
• the importance of technological convergence for institutions and audiences;
• the issues raised in the targeting of national and local audiences (specifically, British) by international or global institutions;
• the ways in which the candidates’ own experiences of media consumption illustrate wider patterns and trends of audience behaviour.

the issues raised by media ownership in contemporary (current) media practice

The depth and range of ownership across a range of media and the consequences of this ownership for audiences in terms of the genres and budgets for films. How for instance, can Channel4's Film4 survive in the British market place against the high concept, big-budget films made by Newcorp's FOX, Warner Bros, Disney, Universal, etc.? What kinds of niche audiences are left for Film4 to attract? Are mass audiences out of reach given the genres of films Film4 have the budgets to make? How successful have they been in reaching mass audiences with their films? How healthy is it that just a few mega media groups can own such a range of media and can decide what the public may see, and, perhaps, shape audience's tastes?

• the importance of cross media convergence and synergy in production, distribution and marketing

 Digital technology is enabling various media to converge in hubs, platforms and devices. For instance, mobiles phones do a lot more than act as hand held telephones: you can download and watch films and TV programmes, use them as alarm clocks, watches, play music on them, take photos and short films, text, go online, use GPS functions, a range of apps, and a whole lot more. New HD TVs, Playstations, X-Boxes, iPads, Notebooks, MacBooks, etc. are also examples of hubs which in which a variety of media technologies can converge for convenience for users. Media convergence is having an enormous impact on the film industry because of the ways in which institutions can produce and market for audiences/users on a widening range of platforms, capable of receiving their films.



Synergies can come out of an organisation's size; smaller media organisations such as Channel4 can-cross promote their films, etc. but the scale of cross-media promotion is nowhere near as great as that which can be gained by massive media organisations. Film4 is therefore unable to promote their lower budget films on a level playing field.

• the technologies that have been introduced in recent years at the levels of production, distribution, marketing and exchange

The audience's ability to interact with films by, for instance, using digital technology to put extracts on You Tube and overlay new sound tracks on them, etc. and make answering videos has been greatly enhanced by Web 2.0; Film studios can make films using CGI, greenscreen and other special effects that were impossible to make only a few years ago. The ways of filming and editing films have changed, too, with the introduction of digital film and film cameras, editing software, laptops, digital projectors, etc. Distributors market films using the latest software for designing high-concept film posters and trailers. They can use phone apps., online marketing, Twitter, etc. File-sharing and piracy are growing issues because the software exists to take the protective encryption of DVDs, etc and WEB 2.0 enables people to make and share copies of films easily. One way in which film companies are trying to get around this is by releasing films soon after theatrical release by selling them on video-on-demand, premium TV channels and downloads. US and UK cinemas chains are not happy about this, especially after all the investment some have made on digital equipment, projectors, etc. which unfortunately quickly goes very quickly out of date!

• the significance of proliferation in hardware and content for institutions and audiences

This means the increase of something: i.e. digital cameras, software, CGI, 3D films, film genres, etc. which are part of current trends; how significant is this for See Saw Films or Film4? Or are they still able to be successful without it by making films with genres that do not need the latest breakthroughs in digital technology? Research the film company's use of cameras, special effects, software, posters, digital distribution of films, etc.

• the importance of technological convergence for institutions and audiences

This is a WEB 2.0 issue and how technology is coming together in hubs like laptops is one of the features of our age; the mobile phone in your pocket is a great example of technological convergence: it can do so much more than a simple phone call; think how this is affecting film making at the production, marketing and exhibition stages? The Internet is acting as a hub for many aspects of film: you will find film posters, YouTube videos on films, interviews, trailers, official film and blog websites, etc. on it.  Audiences can also remake their own films by creating extracts and running new scores over them and then posting them on YouTube. This often leads to answering videos, never mind the comments, etc. that people make  on such sites. The internet, film and videos games seems to be converging in so many ways. People can watch films in a range of ways, using an astonishing range of hardware and software. They can also find audiences of their own. This amounts to free publicity for film institutions for their films and "A Long Tail" sales into the future through endless exchange.

• the issues raised in the targeting of national and local audiences (specifically, British) by international or global institutions

"Slumdog Millionaire" was originally aimed at Asian audiences living in various parts of the UK and also at Danny Boyle fans. The film's unexpected success at film festivals and being nominated for the Oscars led to another theatrical release and a crossover from the "indy" art-house into the mainstream. British film makers often make social realism films and aim them at local and regional audiences whereas this would never be enough for the major media players who tend to make high budget, high concept films. They have boutique offshoots who make and often distribute lower budget films, aimed at more high brow audiences. Disney's Mirimax and Fox's Fox Searchlight are examples of such boutique, art-house film distribution.

• the ways in which the candidates’ own experiences of media consumption illustrate wider patterns and trends of audience behaviour
How you consume films whether it is as a social activity after visiting a shopping centre or on an MP4 player or Playstation, is what is at issue here. Visit Pearl and Dean to see how multiplex cinemas are adapting the experience of cinema-going to gain audiences. In an age of falling DVD sales, home cinema and an increase in downloading for both music and film audiences are changing in how they want to consume film. Identify trends and consider where the audience trends are going in the near future.

This unit should be approached through contemporary (up-to-date) examples in the form of case studies based upon one of the specified media areas.


Thanks to DOG for this post.

LINK

Friday, 12 May 2017

Disability-individual and social models



Dominant notions of disability: the individual model
The societal view of disability generally conforms to the individual or overcoming or medical model of disability. This holds that disability is inherent in the individual, whose responsibility it is to ‘overcome’ her or his ‘tragic’ disability.
Often this ‘overcoming’ is achieved through medical intervention, such as attempts at ‘cures’. For example, top wheelchair athlete Tanni Grey-Thompson was forced as a child to wear heavy leg callipers which gave her blisters, rather than being offered the simple and practical option of using a wheelchair.
This approach to disability aims for the normalisation of disabled people, often through the medicalisation of their condition.

The social model of disability
This distinguishes between impairment (the physical or mental 'problem') and disability (the way society views it as being a negative). It holds that impairments are not inherently disabling, but that disability is caused by society which fails to provide for people with impairments, and which puts obstacles in their way.
Examples include access: the built environment often does not allow access for people with mobility problems. Discriminatory attitudes are also disabling: for example, the idea that disability is a personal tragedy for the ‘sufferer’ impinges upon disabled people in a variety of negative ways, from their social relationships to their ability to get jobs.
"Disability is produced in different forms, and in different proportions, in different cultures" (Oliver, 1996).

Difference
It has been argued that dominant notions of ‘normality’ and beauty do not allow for the natural range of difference in human form. These notions are not only prejudicial to the acceptance of disabled people, but also increasingly impact on non-disabled people. Charlotte Cooper, for example, applies the social model to obesity, and concludes that there are some important categories through which obesity can be defined as a disability:
• A slender body is ‘normal’
• Fatness is a deviation from the norm.
• Fat and disabled people share low social status.
• Fatness is medicalised (e.g. jaw-wiring and stomach-stapling).
• Fat people are blamed for their greed and lack of control over their bodies.
Consider why it is that fat people or disabled people are rarely portrayed as sexually attractive.

Use of disabled stereotypes



The media continue to enforce disability stereotypes portraying disabled individuals in a negative un-empowering way.

In his 1991 study, Paul Hunt identified 10 stereotypes that the media use to portray disabled people:

The disabled person as pitiable or pathetic
An object of curiosity or violence
Sinister or evil
The super cripple
As atmosphere
Laughable
His/her own worst enemy
As a burden
As Non-sexual
Being unable to participate in daily life


Shakespeare (1999) presents a potential reason behind the use of one of these stereotypes:

"The use of disability as character trait, plot device, or as atmosphere is a lazy short-cut. These representations are not accurate or fair reflections of the actual experience of disabled people. Such stereotypes reinforce negative attitudes towards disabled people, and ignorance about the nature of disability"

In other words, the disability itself is often used as a hook by writers and film-makers to draw audiences into the story. These one-dimensional stereotypes are often distanced from the audience - where characters are only viewed through their impairment, and not valued as people.

Shakespeare (1999) continues:

"Above all, the dominant images [of disabled people] are crude, one-dimensional and simplistic."

Representation of Disability


Monday, 8 May 2017

Essay 12Y

Discuss the issues raised by media ownership in the production and exchange of media texts in your chosen media area?

LINK

Thursday, 4 May 2017

12V/MS1

Complete the following question:

January 2012

To what extent does digital distribution affect the marketing and consumption of media products in the area of media you have studied?

Use the plan provided.
You have one hour.

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Exam question research and planning

Each group has two exam questions to plan, research and prepare for a whole class resource.

The format is as follows:
  • Exam question
  • Write out the exam question in normal everyday language
  • List keywords
  • Offer detailed examples from the case studies. This must include details relating to the institutions and the films. You also need to link to the audience.
Font - Calibri (main body) Calibri Bold (titles)
Text size - 12 (main body) 14 (titles)

Groups

12Y:
  1. Kitty, Daisy, Caitlin, Hannah (June 2010 & June 2015)
  2. Helen, Abbi, Maya (January 2011 & June 2014)
  3. Phil, Abbie, Jack, Ben (January 2012 & June 2015)
  4. Kate, Amy, Charlotte, Lily (June 2010 & January 2012)
  5. Jay, Sam, Fin, Ethan (January 2011 & June 2014)
12Z:
  1. Ali, Jack, James (June 2014 & June 2015)
  2. Josh, Nicole & Georgia (June 2010 & January 2011)
12V:
  1. Jasmine, Nieeve, Tegan, Rosie (June 2010 & January 2012)
  2. James, Charlee, George Silke, Harri (January 2011 & June 2014)
  3. George, Ben, Frank, Izzy (January 2012 & June 2014)
  4. Amy, Ceri, Steph (January 2011 & June 2015)
  5. George Anderton, Will, Alfie, Alex, Cam (June 2010 & June 2015)

Questions and group allocation:

June 2010 
What significance does the continuing development of digital media technology have for media institutions and audiences?

January 2011
Discuss the issues raised by media ownership in the production and exchange of media texts in your chosen media area?

January 2012 
To what extent does digital distribution affect the marketing and consumption of media products in the area of media you have studied?

June 2014
The increase in hardware and content in media industries has been significant in recent years. Discuss the effect this has had on institutions and audiences in the media area you have studied.

June 2015 
To what extent does media ownership have an impact on the successful distribution of media products in the media area that you have studied?

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Essay Question Help-Useful Terminology

Convergence - is the tendency for different technological systems to evolve toward performing similar tasks. e.g. ability to watch video on your phone, tablet, console etc

Synergy – The interaction of two or more institutions/companies to ensure a larger effect than
if they acted independently. This is beneficial for each company through efficiencies in expertise and costs.

Exchange – How we access films

Proliferation - the spread of something

Hardware – the physical equipment used to either record, watch or distribute films

Content – the ‘things’ put in a film (SFX, 3D etc)


The Seven Areas of Representation (Common Stereotypes)

Textual Analysis and Representation (The 7 key areas of representation)


You need to understand how the technical elements (in the last post) create specific representations of individuals, groups, events or places and help to articulate specific messages and values that have social significance. 

Particular areas of representation that may be chosen are:
  1. Gender
  2. Age
  3. Ethnicity
  4. Sexuality
  5. Class and status
  6. Physical ability/disability
  7. Regional identity

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Work To Do - Blog admin



Blogs:
  • Ensure your coursework is posted on your blog
  • Upload images from your photo shoot to Flickr (create a gallery and embed on your blog).
  • Save each layer of your magazine as a jpeg (to show how the project evolved). Do this for the cover, contents and double page spread. Compile the images on Photoshop and post to your blog.
  • Label every post correctly.
  • Ensure research and planning and evaluation are labelled.
  • Account for any gaps in the blog.
  • Postdate new blog posts where appropriate.
Add a note for the moderator, look at the example blogs for help.

Make sure the initial layout is as follows:
  • Note to moderator
  • Final Cover
  • Final Contents page
  • Final Double page spread
  • Preliminary magazine
  • Evaluation questions 1-7
  • The different stages of your work-from blank page to completed version (cover, contents and double page)

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Evaluation feedback - Question 6

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 6. 


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Friday, 24 March 2017

Evaluation feedback - Question 7

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 7. 


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Evaluation feedback - Question 5

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 5. 


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Evaluation feedback - Question 4

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 4.


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Evaluation feedback - Question 3

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 3.


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Evaluation feedback - Question 2

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 2. Tegan's answer is particularly noteworthy.


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Deadline for evaluation questions Friday 31st March 3:10 pm.

Monday, 20 March 2017

Full marks research and planning looks like this





Evaluation Feedback - Question 1

Download and print off the feedback sheet for question 1.


Use the advice and examples given to make improvements to your own work.


Remember that your final work MUST be presented in a creative way.

Deadline for evaluation questions Friday 31st March 3:10pm.

Tips and Advice on Layout from Clive Edwards

Below are a series of tips on how a successful magazine should be set out. When analysing magazine front covers evaluate which of these tips they follow.

The first colour is white. The second colour is black. The third colour is red. Calligraphers and early printers grasped this over 500 years ago and experience has proved them exactly right. White for background, black for text, red for accent and excitement. These three colours are the best . Be very careful with all other colours.
Roger Black (designer of Newsweek, Time Out, Esquire, National Enquirer, Rolling Stone)

A cover should be a poster. A single image of a human will sell more copies than multiple images or all type. Always has, always will. Think about why.
Roger Black

Never set a lot of text type in all caps. After a while, it’s just too hard to read.
Roger Black

Use only one or two typefaces. Italian design is the model: a strong sense of a few things that work together. Avoid a free for all of multiple fonts/colours.
Roger Black

Get lumpy! The trouble with most design is that it has no surprise. If you want normal people to pay attention, you have to change pace in your presentation. Monotonous rhythms of picture, headline, picture, text, ad, headline, picture, ad, etc. Is like a pudding without raisins – a stew without lumps.
Roger Black

Break up type to add interest
Chris Frost – Designing for newspapers and magazines

Don’t use too many typefaces. Too much variation will end up looking a mess. It’s best to limit yourself to one font, and variations of it.
Chris Frost

Emphasise your entry point, with larger intro type, bold faces, drop letters, etc. Choose your entry point with care, and make it the focal point of the page.
Chris Frost

Even mediocre photographs attract an audience and a good news picture, even on an inside page, may attract 80% of the readership.
Harold Evans – Pictures on a Page

Just switching type face from serif to sans can result in massive differences in reader comprehension, and response, to advertisements
Colin Wheildon – Are you communicating, or just making pretty shapes? (2005)

There are few major newspapers in the English speaking world today which use the sans serif type for the body text. Conversely, many major magazines choose sans serif. Serif faces have long been regarded as highly readable. One theory is that the serifs acted as tram lines, keeping the eyes on target. Another was that the modulated thick and thin strokes of serif types provided greater opportunity for individual letters, and hence words, to be distinguished and read.
Colin Wheildon

Responses to text in printed colours showed a considerably lower level of good comprehension.
 81% said they would prefer to read the page of coloured type because it was more attractive. But the test results clearly show that in practise, they found coloured text more difficult to read. It was attractive to look at but did not make a good reading environment.
Colin Wheildon

Editors and designers are the missing link between the ape world and man.
Colin Wheildon

Every picture should have a caption. Readers get very irritated if they cannot find the caption. But the caption must not state the obvious. A picture of a vicar pouring a cup of tea, should not have for its caption: Vicar, pouring cup of tea. Captions should add to the information in the photo, not re-state it.
Many music mags use witty, tongue-in-cheek  captions.


Type size for the body of an article should be between 9-14.  (not the headlines, standfirst, crossheads etc). Some newspapers go down to 8, and many would consider that anything above 11 is too large, wastes space, and patronises the reader. 9 is the most common size.

Friday, 10 March 2017

Evaluation Tasks

Useful websites to help you can be found in the link bar on the right hand side.

For the final 20 marks of the project, you must complete seven tasks on your blog, posting them in this order, with the question heading at the top of each task.  Make sure you answer each question as well as producing the visual elements.

1. In what ways does your media product use, develop or challenge forms and conventions of real media products? (i.e. of music magazines)

2. How does your media product represent particular social groups ?

3. What kind of media institution might distribute your media product and why?

4. Who would be the audience for your media product?

5. How did you attract/address your audience?

6. What have you learnt about technologies from the process of constructing this product?

7. Looking back at your preliminary task (the continuity editing task), what do you feel you have learnt in the progression from it to full product?

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 1

In what ways does your media product use, develop or challenge forms and conventions of real media products? (i.e. of music magazines)

As part of your planning and research you should have looked at Music Magazines and selected a particular sub genre (e.g. Indie, pop, r&b, dance etc) to re-create. Find an example of a pre exisiting music magazine which matches your magazine, paste it into your blog and highlight the key generic conventions of the magazine (the list of terminology can be found HERE)

You should go through the final version of your project and select elements which follow conventions and any which do not.

The aspects we would like you to consider across your nine frames are:

The title of the magazine
Graphology/page layouts
Costumes, props, iconography used to reflect genre
Camerawork and framing of images
Title, article, header etc font and style
Genre and how the magazine cover, contents and spread suggests it
How your artist(s) are represented
Colour scheme

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 2

How does your media product represent particular social groups?

Pick a key image of your artist from your magazine (ideally the cover image). Take a screengrab of a reasonable sized image of them. Think of one or more recording artists/stars from other magazines with some similarity to them (but maybe some differences too!), find an image on the web of that/those stars and grab it as well. Drop the two into photoshop, as a split screen. Export this splitscreen image as a jpeg then drop onto your blog and write about the similarities and differences in terms of appearance, costume etc.

So for example if you have a female R&B star on your cover, look for other female R&B star to compare them with (remember to try and ensure that they are of a similar age, ethnicity etc)...

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 3

What kind of media institution might distribute your media product and why?


For this question, you are going to do a 'director's commentary' style voiceover explaining some of the key features of your magazine cover

You will need to script the voiceover which deals with institutional issues to include:

discussion of your production company name and logo and the role of such companies

What does a publishing company do?
the idea of a distributor and who that might be and why. start here
where the money might have come from for a magazine such as yours here
what your magazine is similar to 'institutionally' (name some magazines which would be released in a similar way)
You need to refer to actual company names and processes so you will need to maybe do a bit more research into magazine publishers like emap

When you have scripted, record the voiceover using iMovie, windows movie maker etc on a new audio timeline, then export to quicktime and embed on blog. (this is a good example of what you can do. It was created for A2 and a slightly different question but the style is correct).

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 4

Who would be the audience for your media product?

You should have a drawing of your target audience member and an explanation of what kinds of taste they might have- where they would shop, what music they would listen to, what their favourite Tv programme would be, etc.

make sure you have taken a photo of it, post it on the blog and write a few notes on why they would buy your magazine.

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 5

How did you attract/address your audience?
Take a screen grab of your magazines cover, content and spread and place into iMovie, movie make etc. You will then use YOUTUBE's annotation tools to add NOTES, SPEECHBUBBLES, and LINKS to your magazine:


These annotations will highlight the ways in which your Magazine links to other similiar films in order to attract the particular Audience you have previously identified.

Your annotations will refer to genre conventions, use of iconography, similarities with other magazines and what you have identified as the Unique Selling Point of your magazine.

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 6

What have you learnt about technologies from the process of constructing this product?

In pairs, take a picture of each other holding the kit you have used. This might just be the camera and tripod, and your Macbook but there may be other things you want in the shot.

Drop the image onto your blog and annotate it, adding all the programs and other technology you have used as screengrabs and what you learnt about it/from using it. Your written text need only be minimal. You could include reference to all the online and computer programs you have used such as flickr, blogger, facebook, photoshop, vimeo, scribd, slideshare etc.

EVALUATION ACTIVITY 7

Looking back at your preliminary task (the school magazine task), what do you feel you have learnt in the progression from it to full product?

Concentrate on mise en scene and camerawork.

Grab some images from both tasks and put them on the blog and show what you know about shot types, magazine terms etc. Explain how you've improved.